Category Internal organs

Lung
Internal organs

Lung

The lungs (in Latin Pulmo) is the heart of the human respiratory system. It supplies vital oxygen to the bloodstream by inhaling and disposes of used air through exhalation. Oxygen is needed in the body to extract energy from food. This creates the waste product carbon dioxide, which is removed during exhalation.

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Internal organs

Enlarged spleen

Splenomegaly An enlarged or splenic swelling (medically splenomegaly) is an acute or chronic enlargement of the spleen, which can lead to abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting and a feeling of fullness. Splenomegaly is not an independent disease, but a finding that, analogous to the different functions of the spleen, can have very different causes - in most cases, however, there are infectious diseases (e.g.
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Internal organs

Internal organs

The internal organs mainly include all organs that are not visible inside the body. With the exception of the sensory organs and skin, this applies to all other organs. Organs are specialized parts of the body that perform certain functions in the organism. For example, the stomach organ specializes in storing, mixing, disinfecting, adding enzymes and passing them on to the intestine in portions.
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Internal organs

Intestine

Together with the mouth and stomach, the intestinal tract is largely responsible for the recycling and disposal of the ingested food. Digestion begins in the mouth with chewing and carbohydrate-decomposing enzymes in the saliva. The food pulp is then passed on to the stomach via the trachea.
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Internal organs

Heart

The heart acts as the motor of our circulatory system. The size roughly corresponds to the fist size of the owner. It weighs an average of between 300 and 350 grams. With high regular exercise such as intensive endurance sports and with some diseases such as high blood pressure, the heart can also become significantly larger and heavier.
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Internal organs

Blood vessels

The blood vessels form a kind of tube system in our body and serve to transport the blood, whereby they can be differentiated according to their function in different types. Fresh blood is pumped from the heart first into the so-called main artery (aorta), then into the arteries (arteries) and arterioles (small arteries) and from there into the so-called capillaries (hair vessels).
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Internal organs

Nervous system and brain

Our sensory organs such as eyes, nose, tongue, skin sensors and ears perceive stimuli. This information is transmitted to the cerebrum via the nervous system, where the sensory stimuli are processed and the corresponding reaction is initiated. We can control some of these reactions in a targeted manner, others cannot be influenced.
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Internal organs

Stomach

The human stomach sits slightly to the left of the middle of the body in the upper area of ​​the abdomen. The exact shape and size varies from person to person and also depends on the current filling ratio. On average, the digestive organ is about 20 to 30 centimeters long and has a capacity of around 1.5 liters.
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Internal organs

Kidney

The pair of kidneys is approximately at the level of the lower ribs. The organ performs many important functions in the body, such as detoxification, balancing the fluid and electrolyte balance, the production of hormones and enzymes, and regulating the acid-base balance.
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Internal organs

Lung

The lungs (in Latin Pulmo) is the heart of the human respiratory system. It supplies vital oxygen to the bloodstream by inhaling and disposes of used air through exhalation. Oxygen is needed in the body to extract energy from food. This creates the waste product carbon dioxide, which is removed during exhalation.
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Internal organs

Liver

The liver, which weighs around 1.5 kilograms, is an important metabolic organ in the body. It has a wedge shape and sits on the right side in the upper abdomen. Around 2,000 liters of blood are pumped through the organ every day. The liver can store, utilize, convert or break down substances such as sugar, fat, protein building blocks (amino acids) and vitamins.
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Internal organs

Muscles, ligaments and tendons

The cooperation of muscles, tendons and ligaments make our rigid skeleton a supporting and musculoskeletal system. Each muscle is connected to the corresponding bones to be moved via tendons. The individual bones are in turn connected by joints that are protected, stabilized and moved by ligaments.
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